Thursday, November 26, 2020
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Modifying the gut microbiota: the past, the present, and the future

In a Perspective published in Science, surgeon-scientist Jennifer Wargo explores recent advances in modulating the microbial community within the human gut.

Complexities of microbial gnotobiotic transfer between human and mice

A new study assessed that transplantation of human microbiota into mice durably reshapes the gut microbial community.

How gut bacteria contribute to the development of colorectal cancer

A new study supports the idea that the gut microbiota composition can vary in abundance and function during the development of colorectal cancer.

The path towards microbiota-based therapies

In a commentary published in Cell, five experts discuss the challenges and opportunities of microbiota-based therapies.

Fecal microbiota transplant successfully treat patients with C. diff, UK’s largest...

The largest study of fecal microbiota transplant in the UK shows that the procedure can successfully treat patients with C. diff infection.

Mother’s gut microbes may affect the risk of obesity and diabetes...

A study published in Science suggests that a mother's gut microbes shape the metabolism of offspring, conferring resistance to obesity.

Fecal microbiota transplants: opportunities and challenges

In two articles published in Cell Host & Microbe, scientists discuss some areas of FMT research that could help to develop safe and effective FMT therapies.

UEG 2019, three studies further investigate the role of the microbiome...

Interesting results on the effectiveness of FMT in IBS and on the effects of diet and drugs on the gut microbiota composition and functionality were presented at the UEG 2019 meeting.

A comprehensive look at the microbiota-gut-brain axis

John Cryan at the UCC Ireland and his colleagues reviewed the current knowledge of the influence that gut bacteria have on brain and behavior.

Stool transplants extend life in mice that age prematurely

A study suggests the existence of a link between aging and the gut microbiota. The results may help design probiotic treatments for age-related conditions.